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  • Pauline Commentaries (Vols 37-41)

    STATUS:    In Print
    TRANSLATORS:    Fr. Larcher, Fr. Lamb
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1953 edition

    In the latter half of his career Saint Thomas lectured on all the letters of Saint Paul, bequeathing to the Church a treasury of Scriptural theology and a sure guide to the winding itinerary of the Pauline writings.

    The Aquinas Institute’s edition of the Commentaries on the Letters of Paul features:

    • Text of the Pauline Scripture verses in Greek (Nestle-Aland 27), Latin, and English
    • Complete text of Aquinas in Latin and in English, with Marietti numbering
  • Summa Theologiae (Vols 13-22)

    STATUS:    In Print
    TRANSLATOR:    Fr. Shapcote
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1888-1906 edition
    The Aquinas Institute is proud to announce the publication of the Summa Theologiae in a bilingual edition with Latin and English in parallel columns.

    • English text based on the translation of the Fathers of the English Dominican Province, edited and corrected by the Institute‚Äôs faculty and staff
    • Hardcover, quality binding in an 8 volume set

    The eight-volume set does not include the Supplementum. The two volumes of the Supplementem may be ordered separately. At the same time, the Aquinas Institute has completed a translation of the fourth book of the Commentary on the Sentences, from which the Supplementum was derived.

  • Gospel Commentaries (Vols 33-36)

    STATUS:    In Print
    TRANSLATOR:    Fr. Larcher, Jeremy Holmes
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1951 and 1972 editions
    St. Thomas’s commentaries on the Gospels of Matthew and John are among the most beautiful works of this deep-thinking Doctor of the Church. Dating from the years 1270-72, these commentaries were written as St. Thomas was also composing the third part of the Summa Theologiae and his commentaries on the works of Aristotle. In these volumes, St. Thomas explores the gospels of Matthew and John verse by verse. He brings the both insight of the Fathers of the Church and the philosophy of Aristotle to enlighten his commentary, making a rich theological and philosophical reading of the gospels of Matthew and John.
  • Commentary on the Book of Job (Vol. 32)

    STATUS:    In Print
    TRANSLATOR:    Fr. Brian Mullady
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1965 edition
    This volume of the Old Testament Commentaries is devoted to St. Thomas’s commentary on the book of Job. St. Thomas delves into the question of God’s providence while he comments on Job using all four senses of scripture.
  • Sentences Commentary Book IV (Vols 7-10)

    STATUS:    In Print
    TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition
    This works begins St. Thomas’s most thorough examination of the sacraments. He begins by defining what a sacrament is, then he moves to a study of each individual sacrament. In these volumes, he considers the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, Holy Eucharist, Penance, and Matrimony.

    The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor
    National Endowment for the Humanities
    Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these volumes do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
  • Opuscula I (Vol. 55)

    STATUS:In Print
    TRANSLATOR:Assorted, see below
    SOURCE TEXTS:Leonine 1968-1979 edition
    Compendium Theologiae ~ Cyril Vollert
    De Principiis Naturae ~ R. A. Kocourek
    De Ente et Essentia ~ Robert T. Miller
    De Substantiis Separatis ~ Francis J. Lescoe
    De Regno ad Regem Cypri ~ Gerald B. Phelan and I.T. Eschmann
  • Summa Contra Gentiles (Vols 11-12)

    STATUS:    In Print
    TRANSLATOR:    Fr. Shapcote
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1961 edition
    The first volume of the Summa Contra Gentiles contains the first two books, and the second volume contains the last two books. In the first book, St. Thomas uses a via negationis to strive to learn about God. In the second book, he shows that creation necessitates a creator and that diversity among creatures is a result of God’s providence.

    In the third book of the Summa Contra Gentiles, St. Thomas explores God’s providence over the creation that He created. In the fourth and final book, St. Thomas examines the things that are accessible to human reason only because of divine revelation. In short, he considers the Trinity.
  • Metaphysics (Vols. 50-51)

    STATUS:   In Print
    TRANSLATOR:    John P. Rowan
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1971 edition
    Foundational in its consideration of being and the transcendentals, the Metaphysics of Aristotle is a dense and difficult work on its own. This volume contains the first half of St. Thomas’s commentary on the Metaphysics, beginning with discussing the views of Aristotle’s predecessors and moving towards a discussion of being.
  • Vol. 47: Physics

    STATUS:   Formatting for Publication
    TRANSLATOR:    Richard J. Blackwell, Pierre H. Conway et alia
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1884 edition
    This volume is devoted St. Thomas’s commentary on the Physics. In the Physics, Aristotle delves into what makes things what they are. In commenting on this fundamental text of Aristotelian philosophy, St. Thomas takes Aristotle’s thoughts and deepens them.
  • Vol. 29: Psalms

    STATUS:    Formatting for Publication

    TRANSLATOR:    Sr. Albert Marie Surmanski, O. P., Sr. Maria Veritas Marks, O. P. et alia
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Parma 1863 edition, Busa 1980 edition
    This volume contains St. Thomas’s commentaries on the Psalms (Thomas commented on Psalms 1-54), as well as two of St. Thomas‚Äôs inaugural lectures on Scripture: ‚ÄúRigans Montes de Superioribus,‚ÄĚ based on Ps 103:13, and ‚ÄúHic est Liber Mandatorum Dei,‚ÄĚ based on Bar 4:1.
  • Vol. 30: Isaiah

    STATUS:    Formatting for Publication
    TRANSLATORS:   Louis St. Hilaire
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1974 edition
    This volume contains St. Thomas’s commentary on Isaiah.
  • Vol. 31: Jeremiah

    STATUS:    Formatting for Publication

    TRANSLATORS:   Ben Martin, Mark Foudy, Louis St. Hilaire
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Parma 1863 edition, Leonine 1974 edition
    This volume contains St. Thomas’s commentaries on Jeremiah and Lamentations.
  • Vol. 25: De Potentia

    STATUS:   Editing
    TRANSLATOR:    Fathers of the English Dominican Province
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1965 edition
    The disputed questions De Potentia are divided into two parts, the first of which treats of God’s power while the second considers the Trinity. In the first part, St. Thomas considers the genitive and creative power of God as well as creation and the conservation of being.
  • Vol. 49: De Anima

    STATUS:    Editing

    TRANSLATOR:    Kenelm Foster and Sylvester Humphries; Kevin White and Edward M. Macierowski
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1984 edition
    Included in this volume of the Commentaries on Aristotle are the commentaries on Aristotle’s On the Soul; On Sensing and Sensation, and On Generation and Corruption. By analyzing On the Soul, St. Thomas shows the value of Aristotle’s understanding of the soul as he enriches and expounds on it. St. Thomas probes Aristotle’s understanding of the senses in On Sensing and Sensation.

    Finally, in On Generation and Corruption, St. Thomas presents Aristotle’s thought on the coming to be and passing away of substances.

  • Vol. 28: Quodlibetal Questions

    STATUS:   Editing
    TRANSLATOR:    Urban Hannon
    SOURCE TEXTS:   Leonine 1996 edition
    This volume contains the twelve quodlibetal questions of St. Thomas Aquinas.
  • Vol. 56: Polemical Writings

    STATUS:Editing
    TRANSLATOR:Assorted, see below
    SOURCE TEXTS:Leonine 1969-1976 edition
    Contra Impugnantes ~ John Procter
    De Perfectione Spiritualis Vitae ~ John Procter
    Contra Retrahentes ~ John Procter
    De Unitate Intellectus ~ Rose Brennan
    De Aeternitate Mundi ~ Robert T. Miller
  • Vol. 3: Sentences II.1-20

    STATUS:    Editing
    TRANSLATORS:    Fr. Dylan Schrader, Dr. Beth Mortensen
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
    Moving from exploring the Trinity, St. Thomas now begins to examine creation and God as creator. In this volume, St. Thomas discusses the creation of the angels and the creation of the world. He also begins his treatment of the creation of man.

    The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor
    National Endowment for the Humanities
    Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these volumes do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
  • Vol. 4: Sentences II.21-44

    STATUS:    Editing
    TRANSLATORS:    Fr. Dylan Schrader, Dr. Beth Mortensen
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
    Continuing his discussion of the creation of man, St. Thomas explores the fall of man. He then examines grace and original sin. From this he moves to a consideration of evil, sin and its consequences.

    The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor
    National Endowment for the Humanities
    Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these volumes do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
  • Vol. 5: Sentences III.1-22

    STATUS:    Editing
    TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Chris Decaen, Dr. Beth Mortensen
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition
    This volume begins the consideration of the Incarnation. He treats of how it is possible for the Son to assume human nature and why the Incarnation is necessary for the redemption of man.

    The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor
    National Endowment for the Humanities
    Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these volumes do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
  • Vol. 6: Sentences III.23-60

    STATUS:    Editing
    TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Chris Decaen, Dr. Beth Mortensen
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition
    Considering the redemption of man, directed St. Thomas’s attention toward a study of the theological virtues that make it possible for man to live a good life. This leads to a discussion of virtues in general along with a consideration of the active and contemplative life.

    The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor
    National Endowment for the Humanities
    Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these volumes do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
  • Vol. 58: Sermons & Liturgical Works

    STATUS:Editing
    TRANSLATOR:    Mark-Robin Hoogland, CP, et alia

    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine edition

    Sermo Abjiciamus opera
    Sermo Attendite
    Sermo Beata gens
    Sermo Beati qui habitant
    Sermo Beatus vir
    Sermo Coelum et terra
    Sermo Ecce ego mitto
    Sermo Ecce rex tuus
    Sermo Emitte Spiritum
    Sermo Exiit qui seminat
    Sermo Germinet terra
    Sermo Homo quidam erat
    Sermo Homo quidam fecit
    Sermo Lauda et laetare
    Sermo Lux orta est
    Sermo Osanna filio David
    Sermo Puer Iesus
    Sermo Seraphim stabant
    Sermo Veniet desideratus
    Officium de Festo Corporis Christi ~ Vincent Corrigan and Joseph Kenny
    Hymnus Adoro Te ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins
  • Vol. 54: Other Commentaries

    STATUS:    Editing
    TRANSLATOR:   Rose E. Brennan, Elizabeth Collins-Smith, Peter King, Urban Hannon
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1950 edition, Leonine 1992 edition, E.J. Brill 1965 edition
    This volume contains St. Thomas’s commentaries, De Causis Prolci, De Divinis Nominibus Dionysii, De Ebdomadibus Boethii and De Trinitate Boethii.
  • Vol. 23: De Veritate I

    STATUS:   Editing
    TRANSLATOR:    Robert W. Mulligan and James V. McGlynn
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1970-1976 edition
    In the first part of the disputed questions De Veritate, St. Thomas considers truth and knowledge. In particular he considers knowledge in angels and men. St. Thomas considers at length how men know and discusses how Christ knew as a man.
  • Vol. 24: De Veritate II

    STATUS:    Translating
    TRANSLATOR:    Br. Maria Evagrius Hayden, OSB
    SOURCE TEXTS:   Leonine 1970-1976 edition
    The second part of the disputed questions De Veritate considers the good. St. Thomas is interested in the good in general and the appetite for the good. He also seeks to understand God’s will and man’s free will along with a consideration of how the wicked are justified.
  • Vol. 26: Disputed Questions De anima et alia

    STATUS:    Editing/Translating
    TRANSLATOR:    John P. Rowan et alia
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine; Marietti
    This volume contains four disputed questions: De Anima, De virtutibus, De spiritualibus creaturis, and De Unione Verbi Incarnati. In these questions, St. Thomas delves into the study of the human soul, the virtues, spiritual substances, and finally, he ponders what constitutes the unity of the person of Christ.
  • Vol. 57: Collations & Letters

    STATUS:Editing/Translating
    TRANSLATOR:Joseph B. Collins, Ryan Brady, Luca D’Anselmi, et alia
    SOURCE TEXTS:Leonine 1967-1979 edition, Marietti 1953 edition
    Collationes in Decem Precepta ~ Joseph B. Collins and Joseph Kenny
    Collationes in Orationem Dominicam ~ Joseph B. Collins
    Collationes in Symbolum Apostolorum ~ Joseph B. Collins
    Collationes in Salutationem Angelicam ~ Joseph B. Collins
    De Rationibus Fidei ~ Joseph Kenny
    Super Decretales ~ Howard Galloway
    De Articulis Fidei ~ Howard Galloway and Joseph B. Collins
    Contra Errores Graecorum ~ Copyright Research
    De Forma Absolutionis ~¬†Luca D’Anselmi
    Responsio ad Magistrum Ioannem de Vercellis de 108 Articulis ~ Luca D’Anselmi
    Responsio ad Lectorem Venetum de 30 Articulis ~ Ryan Brady
    Responsio ad Magistrum Ioannem de Vercellis de 43 Articulis ~ Ryan Brady
    Responsio ad Lectorem Venetum de 36 Articulis ~ Ryan Brady
    Responsio ad Lectorem Bisuntium de 6 Articulis ~ Ryan Brady
    De Emptione et Venditione ~ Copyright Research
    De Secreto ~ Copyright Research
    De Sortibus ~ Copyright Research
    De Iudiciis Astrorum ~ Copyright Research
    Ad Bernardum ~ Rik van Nieuwenhove
    Ad Ducissam Brabantiae ~ Copyright Research
    De Mixtione Elementorum ~ Peter Orlowski
    De Motu Cordis ~ Copyright Research
    De Operationibus Occultis ~ J.B. McAllister
  • Vol. 53: Politics

    STATUS:   Translating
    TRANSLATOR:    Ernest L. Fortin and Peter D. O’Neill, Francis Fast, Sean Pilcher
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1992 edition, Marietti 1950 edition, E.J. Brill 1965 edition
    The final volume in our set of Commentaries on Aristotle includes the Tabula Libri Ethicorum and the commentary on Politics. The Tabula Libri Ethicorum is a table drawn up by St. Thomas that organizes the principal themes in the Nicomachean Ethics and Albert the Great’s commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics. In the incomplete commentary on Politics St. Thomas examines Aristotle’s political thought.
  • Vol. 48: De Caelo

    STATUS:    Translating
    TRANSLATOR:    Fabian R. Larcher and Pierre H. Conway et alia
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1886 edition
    This volume contains the commentaries on two of Aristotle’s works, those on his On Heaven and Earth and Meteorology. On Heaven and Earth was influential in forming St. Thomas’s view of the celestial bodies; the work Meteorology treats of the material explanations of the physical world.
  • Vol. 1: Sentences Commentary I.1-21

    STATUS:    Translating
    TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Chris Decaen
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
    In this volume, St. Thomas begins to explore the Trinity, following the order in the Sentences. He treats of the unity of God, the generation of the Son, the proceeding of the Holy Spirit, as well as considering the equality of the persons in the Trinity.
  • Vol. 2: Sentences Commentary I.22-48

    STATUS:    Translating
    TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Chris Decaen
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
    Continuing in the same manner as the first volume, St. Thomas continues his examination of the Trinity, and then moves on to discuss the ways that God can be known. He also unfolds an understanding of predestination and the Divine Will.
  • Vol. 27: De Malo

    STATUS:    Translator Needed
    SOURCE TEXTS:   Marietti 1965 edition
    This volume contains the disputed questions De Virtutibus, where St. Thomas explores what a virtue is and how virtues relate to the powers of the soul. In the disputed questions De Spiritualibus Creaturis, St. Thomas treats of what spiritual creatures are and how they are distinguished.
  • Vol. 52: Nicomachean Ethics

    STATUS:    Translating
    TRANSLATOR:    Michael Bolin
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1969 edition
    The Nicomachean Ethics contains Aristotle’s deepest thoughts on how one ought to live. Aristotle speaks of moderation, virtues and the need to pursue an intellectual life. St. Thomas expounds upon the merit of Aristotle’s life, showing how this understanding can help the Christian to live a good life, while recognizing that grace makes the good life easier to live.
  • Vol. 46: Posterior Analytics

    STATUS:    Translator Needed
    TRANSLATOR:    Fabian R. Larcher et alia
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1989 edition
    This first volume of St. Thomas’s Commentaries on Aristotle contains the commentaries on the On Interpretation and the Posterior Analytics. On Interpretation considers the relationship between language and logic, while the Posterior Analytics is Aristotle’s famous treatise on logic. St. Thomas brings his insight to help the reader understand the fullness of Aristotle’s thought.
  • Vols 42-45: Catena Aurea

    STATUS:    Research
    TRANSLATOR:    John Henry Newman
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1953 edition

    The Catena Aurea is one of St. Thomas’s most interesting works. It is a compilation of the thoughts of the Church Fathers on the four Gospels. St. Thomas quotes from an array of the Latin Church Fathers as well as quoting from an unexpectedly large number of the Eastern Church Fathers. St. Thomas carefully selected and edited these quotations so that each work would be a united whole. In a manner uncommon for an author of his time, St. Thomas was careful to note his sources.

    As a gloss of the Gospels containing quotations from the Church Fathers of both the East and the West, arranged and selected by St. Thomas, the Catena Aurea is a rare aid for studying scripture.

  • Vol. 59: Biographies

    STATUS:    Research
    TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition
    For the avid Aquinas scholar, a wealth of knowledge about the Saint himself comes through the materials collected in these two volumes of Historical Documents.The first volume will contain the most authoritative and contemporary biographies of Aquinas, while the second volume will be a collection of papal documents referring to the Angelic Doctor. Diving into the historical context of Aquinas’ life brings the reader closer to understanding the man, Thomas, himself and the rich theological and philosophical insights he gave to the Church through his many writings.
  • Vol. 60: Papal Documents

    STATUS:    Research
    TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
    SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition
    For the avid Aquinas scholar, a wealth of knowledge about the Saint himself comes through the materials collected in these two volumes of Historical Documents.The first volume will contain the most authoritative and contemporary biographies of Aquinas, while the second volume will be a collection of papal documents referring to the Angelic Doctor. Diving into the historical context of Aquinas’ life brings the reader closer to understanding the man, Thomas, himself and the rich theological and philosophical insights he gave to the Church through his many writings.

MAJOR WORKS

Sentences Commentary (1-10)

The school of Aquinas’ deep¬†theological and philosophical thought begins here.

All the famous medieval scholastics, from John Duns Scotus to William of Ockham, wrote their own commentaries on Peter Lombard’s¬†Sentences.

Aquinas’ work is the equivalent of a doctoral dissertation that¬†prepared him to teach¬†theology in Paris and marked the beginning of his writing career.

Summa Contra Gentiles (11-12)

To make missionaries, Aquinas knew that his brethren needed to understand the faith.

As a kind of apologetic work, the Summa Contra Gentiles provides explanations for the faith with the intent of sharing that faith with others.

Spanning the goodness of creation to the mystery of the Trinity, Aquinas reveals those parts of theology that can be understood by human reason, and those which surpass reason.

Summa Theologiae (13-22)

Aquinas begins his famous Summa Theologiae by getting right to the heart of what every person longs to see: the face of God.

Spanning subjects as diverse as law and government, sacraments and liturgy, and psychology and ethics, Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae remains one of the great seminal works of theology and philosophy.

As his most well-known publication, one could say that if you haven’t read the Summa, you haven’t read Aquinas.

Disputed Questions (23-28)

Aquinas was not only a teacher, but a debater as well.

In the way of Socrates, Aquinas engaged with his students’ questions. As opposed to the¬†Summa Theologiae, however, the¬†Disputed Questions focus in on specific topics.

Explore Aquinas’ thoughts on epistemology, free will, the hypostatic union, and more in his many Disputed Questions.

SCRIPTURAL STIUDIES

Old Testament Commentaries (29-32)

Sacred scripture was Aquinas’ area of expertise.

Though he was an accomplished philosopher, Aquinas considered himself a Biblical scholar first and wrote on the Old Testament throughout his life.

Spanning the books of Psalms, Jeremiah, Job and more, these scriptural commentaries showcase Aquinas’ development as a writer and exegetical skill.

Gospel Commentaries (33-36)

To delve into Aquinas’ thoughts on the Gospels, one need look no further than his commentaries on Matthew and John.

A great resource for pastors, seminarians, and the lay faithful, Aquinas synthesizes the thoughts of Aristotle and insights of the Church Fathers in his treatment of the Gospels.

Now in a full four volume set!

Pauline Commentaries (37-41)

“Any serious reader of St. Paul must know this commentary.” – Matthew Levering

Peering into Paul’s writings, Aquinas draws on the tradition of the Church Fathers to reveal the beauties of these saintly letters.

As an exercise of exegetical scholarship, Aquinas illuminates Paul’s treatment of grace and spiritual adoption for all readers in a manner worthy of the subject.

Catena Aurea (42-45)

Rooted in the Church Fathers, Aquinas synthesizes scripture and tradition in his gloss of the four Gospels.

Considering both Eastern and Latin Church Fathers, Aquinas’¬†Catena Aurea provides a unified and unique aid to scripture study for the modern Christian.

As a true teacher, Aquinas displays the thought of the Fathers with clarity and provides an enriching guide to reading the Gospels.

EXTENDED WORKS

Aristotle Commentaries (46-53)

A learner as well as a teacher, Aquinas’ study of Aristotle inspired an integrated Catholic philosophy.

Fleshing out many Aristotelian ideas for the Catholic reader, Aquinas considers where this philosopher’s work might be helpful for the faithful’s conception of the world.

From politics to potency and metaphysics, Aquinas showcases the intersection between faith and reason.

Other Commentaries (54)

Eager to discover, Aquinas’ own studies included the writings of Boethius, Pseudo-Dionysius, and the realm of Neo-Platonic thought.

Always one to consider and question, Aquinas’ dialogues between Aristotelian thought and Neo-Platonic ideas enlighten readers as to their philosophical distinctions.

In a true scholarly spirit, this saint’s extensive commentaries reveal his desire to learn and grapple with reality.

Opuscula (55-58)

A kind of Summa Theologiae for beginners, Aquinas writes his “little works” for the new reader.

Touching on a variety of subject matter, each of Aquinas’ Opuscula relay his keen sense of humor and interest in the wide-ranging topics of his day.

Certainly a man in contact with the world around him, Aquinas’ writings reveal the concerns and questions of his own contemporaries, explaining matters of faith, philosophy, liturgy in easy-to-understand terms.

Historical Documents (59-60)

For more information on Aquinas himself, consult the papal documents and biographies written in light of Aquinas’ teachings and his person.

For the avid Aquinas scholar, these sources are a valuable means of deepening one’s understanding of Aquinas outside of his own works.