Opera Omnia of St. Thomas Aquinas

The Aquinas Institute is publishing the complete works of St. Thomas Aquinas. The goal is to have each work available in Latin and English in three formats: online, eBook, and print.

The Latin-English bilingual edition will be 60 volumes, grouped into the following twelve sets:

Sentences Commentary (1-10)

The Commentary on the Sentences dates from St. Thomas’s first teaching years in Paris, where he began teaching around the year 1252. As a new teacher, St. Thomas was expected to prepare lectures based on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, thus demonstrating his knowledge of and insight into both theology and philosophy. In the Sentences, St. Thomas was presented with a general theology text which draws upon the writings of the Church Fathers. This was a significant opportunity for St. Thomas to delve into the beauty of theology.Although this text is a commentary on the Sentences, it also contains much original theological thought of St. Thomas himself as he departs at times from the text that he is commenting on to explore other facets of the teaching set forth by Peter Lombard. As this work comes from the earlier years of St. Thomas’s career, it is evident that it represents St. Thomas’s seminal theological thought that is later developed and sharpened in the Summa Theologiae and the Summa Contra Gentiles.

Vol. 1: Commentary on the Sentences Book I, Distinctions 1-21
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATOR:    Fr. Jason Mitchell
SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
In this volume, St. Thomas begins to explore the Trinity, following the order in the Sentences. He treats of the unity of God, the generation of the Son, the proceeding of the Holy Spirit, as well as considering the equality of the persons in the Trinity.
Vol. 2: Commentary on the Sentences Book I, Distinctions 22-48
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATOR:    Fr. Jason Mitchell
SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
Continuing in the same manner as the first volume, St. Thomas continues his examination of the Trinity, and then moves on to discuss the ways that God can be known. He also unfolds an understanding of predestination and the Divine Will.
Vol. 3: Commentary on the Sentences Book II, Distinctions 1-20
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Beth Mortensen, Fr. Dylan Schrader
SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
Moving from exploring the Trinity, St. Thomas now begins to examine creation and God as creator. In this volume, St. Thomas discusses the creation of the angels and the creation of the world. He also begins his treatment of the creation of man.
Vol. 4: Commentary on the Sentences Book II Distinctions 21-44
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Beth Mortensen, Fr. Dylan Schrader
SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
Continuing his discussion of the creation of man, St. Thomas explores the fall of man. He then examines grace and original sin. From this he moves to a consideration of evil, sin and its consequences.
Vol. 5: Commentary on the Sentences Book III, Distinctions 1-22
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Beth Mortensen, Fr. Dylan Schrader
SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition
This volume begins the consideration of the Incarnation. He treats of how it is possible for the Son to assume human nature and why the Incarnation is necessary for the redemption of man.
Vol. 6: Commentary on the Sentences Book III, Distinctions 23-40
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Beth Mortensen, Fr. Dylan Schrader
SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition
Considering the redemption of man, directed St. Thomas’s attention toward a study of the theological virtues that make it possible for man to live a good life. This leads to a discussion of virtues in general along with a consideration of the active and contemplative life.
Vol. 7: Commentary on the Sentences Book IV, Distinctions 1-13
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
EDITORS:    Dr. Peter Kwasniewksi, Dr. Jeremy Holmes
SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition

This volume begins St. Thomas’s most thorough examination of the sacraments. He begins by defining what a sacrament is, then he moves to a study of each individual sacrament. In this volume, he considers the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation and the Holy Eucharist.The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Vol. 8: Commentary on the Sentences Book IV, Distinctions 14-25
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
EDITORS:    Dr. Peter Kwasniewksi, Dr. Jeremy Holmes
SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition

St. Thomas continues his treatise on the Holy Eucharist after the conclusion of which he begins the treatise on Penance. This naturally turns his consideration to the sacrament of Holy Orders.The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Vol. 9: Commentary on the Sentences Book IV, Distinctions 26-42
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
EDITORS:    Dr. Peter Kwasniewksi, Dr. Jeremy Holmes
SOURCE TEXTS:    Parma 1858 edition

This volume contains St. Thomas’s treatise of the sacrament of Matrimony, which he explores in great detail. He explains that Matrimony is unique among the sacraments because it builds upon a natural union.The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Vol. 10: Commentary on the Sentences Book IV, Distinctions 43-50
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
EDITORS:    Dr. Peter Kwasniewksi, Dr. Jeremy Holmes
SOURCE TEXTS:    Parma 1858 edition

The last volume of the Commentary on the Sentences continues the treatise on Marriage. Finally St. Thomas discusses man’s last end, the resurrection of the body, God’s justice, the final judgment and what constitutes blessedness.The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

National Endowment for the Humanities

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these volumes do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Summa Contra Gentiles (11-12)

The Summa Contra Gentiles comes to us in a manuscript penned and revised by St. Thomas. It is thought that St. Thomas began writing this work around the year 1259 when he had returned to Italy for a stay of several years.

This work is written for those who need to understand their faith in order to explain it to others. For this reason, as well as the depth of St. Thomas’s thought contained in this work, the Summa Contra Gentiles is a relevant work for the modern age. Reading the Summa Contra Gentiles we are guided by the clarity of St. Thomas’s thought as he explores providence, creation other relevant topics. In particular, the portion of this work which St. Thomas devotes to considering the sacraments is particularly helpful, as the Summa Theologiae is incomplete, leaving off before St. Thomas treated of all of the sacraments.

Of the Summa Contra Gentiles, Rene-Antoine Gauthier affirms, ‚ÄúThe Summa Contra Gentiles is an essay in personal reflection.‚ÄĚ This is St. Thomas at his best.

Vol. 11: Summa Contra Gentiles I-II
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Lawrence Shapcote, O.P.
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1918 edition, Marietti 1961 edition
This first volume of the Summa Contra Gentiles contains the first two books. In the first book, St. Thomas uses a via negationis to strive to learn about God. In the second book, he shows that creation necessitates a creator and that diversity among creatures is a result of God’s providence.
Vol. 12: Summa Contra Gentiles III-IV
STATUS:   In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Lawrence Shapcote, O.P.
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1926 edition, Marietti 1961 edition
In the third book of the Summa Contra Gentiles, St. Thomas explores God’s providence over the creation that He created. In the fourth and final book, St. Thomas examines the things that are accessible to human reason only because of divine revelation. In short, he considers the Trinity.

Summa Theologiae (13-22)

We are now witnessing in the United States a revival of orthodox Catholic theological education, rooted explicitly in the theology of Saint Thomas Aquinas, as countless popes and Church documents recommend.

Surprisingly, however, there does not yet exist an affordable, high-quality edition of the saint‚Äôs greatest systematic work of dogmatic and moral theology, the Summa Theologiae. In particular, it is difficult and expensive to acquire an edition in the original language in which St. Thomas wrote‚ÄĒthe Church‚Äôs mother tongue of Latin‚ÄĒand for many who are either just learning to read Latin or who wish to glance occasionally at an English translation while working with the original, there has never been an adequate and convenient bilingual edition of the Summa.

The Aquinas Institute is therefore proud to announce the publication of the Summa Theologiae in a bilingual edition with Latin and English in parallel columns.

‚ÄĘ Complete text in Latin and in English
‚ÄĘ English text based on the translation of the Fathers of the English Dominican Province, edited and corrected by the Institute‚Äôs faculty and staff
‚ÄĘ Hardcover, quality binding in an 8 volume set
‚ÄĘ Affordable price

The eight-volume set does not include the Supplementum at this time. The two volumes of the Supplementem may be ordered separately. At the same time, the Aquinas Institute has completed a translation of the fourth book of the Commentary on the Sentences.

Disputed Questions (23-29)

As a teacher St. Thomas Aquinas engaged in disputations with his students that were focused on answering and exploring one question or theme. These disputations were later rewritten and heavily edited to be short works. For this stylistic reason the Disputed Questions are grouped together. These questions have a range of subject matter that is united by the use of the same writing style throughout the questions. This approach of asking and answering questions is the same method that St. Thomas employs in the Summa Theologiae, the difference is that each disputed question is a short, individual work, with a variety of unique topics, while the Summa Theologiae unites them into one large work.

 

Because each work is a short, cohesive whole devoted to a single topic, the Disputed Questions are an excellent way to experience St. Thomas’s thought on many different topics.

Vol. 23: De Veritate I
STATUS:    Editing for Publication
TRANSLATOR:    Robert W. Mulligan and James V. McGlynn
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1970-1976 edition
In the first part of the disputed questions De Veritate, St. Thomas considers truth and knowledge. In particular he considers knowledge in angels and men. St. Thomas considers at length how men know and discusses how Christ knew as a man.
Vol. 24: De Veritate II
STATUS:    Searching for Translator
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1970-1976 edition
The second part of the disputed questions De Veritate considers the good. St. Thomas is interested in the good in general and the appetite for the good. He also seeks to understand God’s will and man’s free will along with a consideration of how the wicked are justified.
Vol. 25: De Potentia
STATUS:    Editing for Publication
TRANSLATOR:    Fathers of the English Dominican Province
SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1965 edition
The disputed questions De Potentia are divided into two parts, the first of which treats of God’s power while the second considers the Trinity. In the first part, St. Thomas considers the genitive and creative power of God as well as creation and the conservation of being.
Vol. 26: De Anima
STATUS:    Editing for Publication
TRANSLATOR:    John P. Rowan
SOURCE TEXTS:    Vives 1875 edition
In the disputed questions De Anima St. Thomas delves into the study of the human soul. He considers what a soul is, whether it is different from an angel, what the powers of the soul are, whether the soul is a composite of matter and form as well as the soul separated from the body.
Vol. 27: De Virtutibus and De Spiritualibus Creaturis
STATUS:    Searching for Translator
SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1965 edition
This volume contains the disputed questions De Virtutibus, where St. Thomas explores what a virtue is and how virtues relate to the powers of the soul. In the disputed questions De Spiritualibus Creaturis, St. Thomas treats of what spiritual creatures are and how they are distinguished.
Vol. 28: De Unione Verbi Incarnati and De Malo
STATUS:    Searching for Translator
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1982 edition
This volume contains two disputed questions: De Unione Verbi Incarnati and De Malo. In De Unione Verbi Incarnati, St. Thomas ponders what constitutes the unity of the person of Christ. In De Malo, St. Thomas explores the question of evil.
Vol. 29: Quodlibetal Questions
STATUS:    Editing for Publication
TRANSLATOR:    Urban Hannon
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine Edition
This volume contains the collection of disputed questions called the Quodlibetal questions. The Quodlibetal questions were a series of lectures that St. Thomas delivered every year during Lent and Advent.

 

Old Testament Commentaries (30-32)

In the Old Testament Commentaries St. Thomas has a style similar to his commentaries on the Gospels and the Pauline epistles. Uniquely, the Old Testament Commentaries are spaced generously throughout the entirety of St. Thomas’s life, ranging from the beginning of St. Thomas’s academic career to shortly before his death. Because the Old Testament Commentaries span St. Thomas’s career, they show the development of his ability to comment on Scripture.

In the early Old Testament Commentaries St. Thomas is primarily concerned with exploring the literal meaning of the texts. Even so he provides clear insights into the texts that he comments upon. Though the number of texts that he chooses to comment upon is limited, these Old Testament Commentaries are an important part of his works.

Vol. 30: Psalms
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATOR:    Sr. Albert Marie Surmanski, O. P.
SOURCE TEXTS:    Parma 1863 edition, Busa 1980 edition
This volume contains St. Thomas’s commentaries on the Psalms. Aquinas commented on Psalms 1-54.
Vol. 31: Jeremiah, Lamentations and Isaiah
STATUS:    Editing for Publication
TRANSLATORS:    Ben Martin, Mark Foudy, Louis St. Hilaire
SOURCE TEXTS:    Parma 1863 edition, Leonine 1974 edition
This volume contains St. Thomas’s commentaries Jeremiah, Lamentations and Isaiah, along with two of his expositions: "Rigans Montes de Superioribus", based on PS 103:13, and ""Hic est Liber Mandatorum Dei", based on Bar 4:1. These commentaries explore the intricacies of this handful of Old Testament books.
Vol. 32: Job
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Fr. Brian Mullady
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1965 edition
This volume of the Old Testament Commentaries is devoted to St. Thomas’s commentary on the book of Job. St. Thomas delves into the question of God’s providence while he comments on Job using all four senses of scripture.

Gospel Commentaries (33-36)

St. Thomas’s commentaries on the Gospels of Matthew and John are among the most beautiful works of this deep-thinking Doctor of the Church. Dating from the years 1270-72, these commentaries were written as St. Thomas was also composing the third part of the Summa Theologiae and his commentaries on the works of Aristotle. In these volumes, St. Thomas explores the gospels of Matthew and John verse by verse. He brings the both insight of the Fathers of the Church and the philosophy of Aristotle to enlighten his commentary, making a rich theological and philosophical reading of the gospels of Matthew and John. Let your study of the gospels of Matthew and John be illumined by the clarity of St. Thomas’s commentary!
Commentaries on the Gospels of Matthew and John are available in a 4 volume set.

Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew

St. Thomas's Commentary on Matthew will guide today's reader in the serious study of the first of the Gospels. The Commentary on Matthew demonstrates a spectacular familiarity with Scripture ranging across both Testaments, a knowledge of the views of Eastern and Western Fathers, and the virtue of discerning the intelligible order in the text, with a view to the author's proximate and ultimate aims. While St. Thomas's commentary cannot substitute for the modern advances in narrative analysis of Matthew, his dogmatic and moral discussions are timeless.

The Commentary on Matthew has a complex textual history, as parts of the original reportatio (a text transcribed by a student listening to the lectures) were either missing or replaced by other content in different versions. Certain previous editions contain defective text. Fortunately, manuscript discoveries in the twentieth century together with textual research on the part of the Leonine Commission have made possible the preparation of an accurate Latin text of the commentary‚ÄĒand this is the reliable text that The Aquinas Institute is publishing.
‚ÄĘ English translation by Dr. Jeremy Holmes and Dr. Beth Mortensen

Commentary on the Gospel of John

The Commentary on John shows the Angelic Doctor at his most profound. He illuminates the doctrine of the text by weaving in Scriptural references, by citing the Church Fathers' interpretations, and by applying his probing mind to unraveling difficulties in the text, all the while leading the reader ever deeper into the ineffable mysteries of the Trinity and the Incarnation. The Commentary on John displays a brilliant integration of philosophical reasoning, biblical wisdom, patristic witness, and theological method.

The acclaimed biographer of Saint Thomas, Fr. Jean-Pierre Torrell, O.P., comments: "It would be a bit foolish to try drawing up a ranking of Thomas's best scriptural commentaries, but it is certain that we could classify this [Commentary on John] as among the most fully finished and most profound that he has left us." In it, says Fr. Torrell, "Thomas reveals himself . . . as one of the contemplatives of whom St. John is the model." Until now, this important work’s availability was limited. The Aquinas Institute is pleased to present the entire Commentary on John in a bilingual Latin-English hardcover edition of two volumes.
‚ÄĘ English text based on the translation of Fr. Larcher, edited by the collaborators of The Aquinas Institute

Pauline Commentaries (37-41)

In the latter half of his career Saint Thomas lectured on all the letters of Saint Paul, bequeathing to the Church a treasury of Scriptural theology and a sure guide to the winding itinerary of the Pauline writings.

The Aquinas Institute is therefore particularly pleased to be offering, for the first time ever, a bilingual Latin/English edition of the entire series of Pauline commentaries, in the elegantly formatted, high-quality hardcover volumes that are a hallmark of Institute publications.

The Aquinas Institute's edition of the Commentaries on the Letters of Paul features:
‚ÄĘ Text of the Pauline Scripture verses in Greek (Nestle-Aland 27), Latin, and English
‚ÄĘ Complete text of Aquinas in Latin and in English, with Marietti numbering
‚ÄĘ English translation based on that of Fr. Larcher, edited and corrected by the Institute's faculty and staff
‚ÄĘ Hardcover, quality binding in 5 volumes

Catena Aurea (42-45)

The Catena Aurea is one of St. Thomas’s most interesting works. It is a compilation of the thoughts of the Church Fathers on the four Gospels. St. Thomas quotes from an array of the Latin Church Fathers as well as quoting from an unexpectedly large number of the Eastern Church Fathers. St. Thomas carefully selected and edited these quotations so that each work would be a united whole. In a manner uncommon for an author of his time, St. Thomas was careful to note his sources.

As a gloss of the Gospels containing quotations from the Church Fathers of both the East and the West, arranged and selected by St. Thomas, the Catena Aurea is a rare aid for studying scripture.

Vol. 42: Gospel of Matthew
STATUS:    Editing
TRANSLATOR:    John Henry Newman
SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1953 edition
This volume of the Catena Aurea is St. Thomas’ compilation of texts for the gospel of Matthew probably finished in time for St. Thomas to present it to Pope Urban IV before the Pope’s death. St. Thomas sheds the light of the Church Fathers on the gospel of Matthew.
Vol. 43: Gospel of Mark
STATUS:    Editing
TRANSLATOR:    John Henry Newman
SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1953 edition
The second volume of the Catena Aurea is St. Thomas’s arrangement of what the Church Fathers write about the gospel of Mark. St. Thomas organizes the texts so that it is clear what the Church Fathers thought about different passages in the gospel of Mark.
Vol. 44: Gospel of Luke
STATUS:    Editing
TRANSLATOR:    John Henry Newman
SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1953 edition
The third volume moves to the compilation of the writings of the Church Fathers concerning the gospel of Luke. St. Thomas’s clarity of thought is helpful in this arrangement of quotations from the Church Fathers concerning the gospel of Luke.
Vol. 45: Gospel of John
STATUS:    Editing
TRANSLATOR:    John Henry Newman
SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1953 edition
The final volume in the Catena Aurea explores the meaning of the gospel of John. The quotations from the Church Fathers show the complexity of this beautiful gospel, guided into a unity of thought by the mind of St. Thomas.

Aristotle Commentaries (46-53)

Exposure to the works of Aristotle was intellectually stimulating for St. Thomas. Throughout St. Thomas’s life this exposure was continually expanding as the works of the Greek philosopher were translated into Latin. St. Thomas found Aristotle’s philosophy helpful in making key distinctions and in providing a foundation for his own explorations. Not only did St. Thomas quote Aristotle extensively in his works, he also wrote commentaries on many of Aristotle’s greatest works. In exploring Aristotle’s works, St. Thomas Aquinas provides a Catholic insight into Aristotle’s philosophy while letting that philosophy form his understanding of the world.

 

In these commentaries, which include the original texts of Aristotle in Greek, Latin, and English, the best of Greek and scholastic philosophy is presented.

Vol. 46: On Interpretation and the Posterior Analytics
STATUS:    Copyright Research
TRANSLATOR:    Jean R. Oesterle and Fabian R. Larcher
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1989 edition
This first volume of St. Thomas’s Commentaries on Aristotle contains the commentaries on the On Interpretation and the Posterior Analytics. On Interpretation considers the relationship between language and logic, while the Posterior Analytics is Aristotle’s famous treatise on logic. St. Thomas brings his insight to help the reader understand the fullness of Aristotle’s thought.
Vol. 47: Physics
STATUS:    Editing for Publication
TRANSLATOR:    Richard J. Blackwell and Richrad J. Sparth and W.Edmund Thirlkel and Pierre H. Conway
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1884 edition
This volume is devoted St. Thomas’s commentary on the Physics. In the Physics, Aristotle delves into what makes things what they are. In commenting on this fundamental text of Aristotelian philosophy, St. Thomas takes Aristotle’s thoughts and deepens them.
Vol. 48: On Heaven and Earth, On Generation and Corruption and Meteorology
STATUS:    Copyright Research
TRANSLATOR:    Fabian R. Larcher and Pierre H. Conway
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1886 edition
This volume contains the commentaries on three of Aristotle’s works, those on his On Heaven and Earth, On Generation and Corruption and Meteorology. On Heaven and Earth was influential in forming St. Thomas’s view of the celestial bodies while On Generation and Corruption presents Aristotle’s thought on the coming to be and passing away of substances. Finally, the work Meteorology treats of the material explanations of the physical world.
Vol. 49: On the Soul and On Sensing and Sensation
STATUS:    Editing for Publication
TRANSLATOR:    Kenelm Foster and Sylvester Humphries and Kevin White
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1984 edition
Included in this volume of the Commentaries on Aristotle are the commentaries on Aristotle’s On the Soul and On Sensing and Sensation. By analyzing On the Soul, St. Thomas shows the value of Aristotle’s understanding of the soul as he enriches and expounds on it. St. Thomas probes Aristotle’s understanding of the senses in On Sensing and Sensation.
Vol. 50: Metaphysics I
STATUS:    Editing for Publication
TRANSLATOR:    John P. Rowan
SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1971 edition
Foundational in its consideration of being and the transcendentals, the Metaphysics of Aristotle is a dense and difficult work on its own. This volume contains the first half of St. Thomas’s commentary on the Metaphysics, beginning with discussing the views of Aristotle’s predecessors and moving towards a discussion of being.
Vol. 51: Metaphysics II
STATUS:    Editing for Publication
TRANSLATOR:    John P. Rowan
SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1971 edition
In the second half of the commentary on the Metaphysics St. Thomas begins by showing how previous philosophers did not explore being itself, while Aristotle does. He next discusses Aristotle’s treatment of potency and act as well as the comparison between potency and act. The commentary concludes as St. Thomas analyzes Aristotle’s consideration of universal goodness.
Vol. 52: Nicomachean Ethics
STATUS:    Copyright Research
TRANSLATOR:    C.I Litzinger
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1969 edition
The Nicomachean Ethics contains Aristotle’s deepest thoughts on how one ought to live. Aristotle speaks of moderation, virtues and the need to pursue an intellectual life. St. Thomas expounds upon the merit of Aristotle’s life, showing how this understanding can help the Christian to live a good life, while recognizing that grace makes the good life easier to live.
Vol. 53: Tabula Libri Ethicorum and Politics
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATOR:    Ernest L. Fortin and Peter D. O'Neill, Sean Pilcher
SOURCE TEXTS:    Leonine 1992 edition, Marietti 1950 edition, E.J. Brill 1965 edition
The final volume in our set of Commentaries on Aristotle includes the Tabula Libri Ethicorum and the commentary on Politics. The Tabula Libri Ethicorum is a table drawn up by St. Thomas that organizes the principal themes in the Nicomachean Ethics and Albert the Great’s commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics. In the incomplete commentary on Politics St. Thomas examines Aristotle’s political thought.

 

Other Commentaries (54)

The Other Commentaries is a collection of the few commentaries by St. Thomas that are neither scriptural nor Aristotelian. They record St. Thomas’s exploration into the thought of such writers as Boethius and Pseudo-Dionysius, both influential in St. Thomas’s day. The Other Commentaries show the contact that St. Thomas had with Neo-Platonism as well as showing his attentive consideration of it. As such, they show an important side of St. Thomas. This is where St. Thomas’s Aristotelian thought meets and engages with Neo-Platonism in a rich dialogue.

 

Exploring the thought of Boethius and Pseudo-Dionysius, as well as the De Causis, in these Other Commentaries with St. Thomas as guide will enlighten your understanding of these authors and of St. Thomas.

Vol. 54: De Causis, De Divinis Nominibus, De Ebdomadibus and De Trinitate
STATUS:    Editing
TRANSLATOR:    Rose E. Brennan, Elizabeth Collins-Smith, Peter King, Harry Marsh  
SOURCE TEXTS:    Marietti 1950 edition, Leonine 1992 edition, E.J. Brill 1965 edition
This volume contains St. Thomas’s commentaries, De Causis Prolci, De Divinis Nominibus Dionysii, De Ebdomadibus Boethii and De Trinitate Boethii.

 

Opuscula (55-58)

Opuscula is Latin for little works, which is what these volumes contain, a collection of the smaller works of St. Thomas. Grouped together because they are shorter than the rest of St. Thomas’s work, these works are not little in the sense that they are less profound. They are the miscellaneous works that show St. Thomas’s boundless desire to know as well as his keen sense of humor and interest in many different topics of his day. The Opuscula contains a wide variety of genres, including some of St. Thomas’s famous responses to his colleagues, letters, liturgical pieces and the Compendium Theologiae written for brother Reginald.The Opuscula are appropriate for the modern reader in their brevity and range of subject matter.

Vol. 55: Opuscula I ‚Äď Treatises
STATUS: In Print
TRANSLATOR: Assorted, see below
SOURCE TEXTS: Leonine 1968-1979 edition
Compendium Theologiae ~ Cyril Vollert
De Principiis Naturae ~ R. A. Kocourek
De Ente et Essentia ~ Robert T. Miller
De Substantiis Separatis ~ Francis J. Lescoe
De Regno ad Regem Cypri ~ Gerald B. Phelan and I.T. Eschmann
Vol. 56: Opuscula II ‚Äď Polemical Writings
STATUS: Editing
TRANSLATOR: Assorted, see below
SOURCE TEXTS: Leonine 1969-1976 edition
Contra Impugnantes ~ John Procter
De Perfectione Spiritualis Vitae ~ John Procter
Contra Retrahentes ~ John Procter
De Unitate Intellectus ~ Rose Brennan
De Aeternitate Mundi ~ Robert T. Miller
Vol. 57: Opuscula III ‚Äď Collations and Letters
STATUS: Looking for Translators
TRANSLATOR: Contact us
SOURCE TEXTS: Leonine 1967-1979 edition, Marietti 1953 edition
Collationes in Decem Precepta ~ Joseph B. Collins and Joseph Kenny
Collationes in Orationem Dominicam ~ Joseph B. Collins
Collationes in Symbolum Apostolorum ~ Joseph B. Collins
Collationes in Salutationem Angelicam ~ Joseph B. Collins
De Rationibus Fidei ~ Joseph Kenny
Super Decretales ~ Howard Galloway
De Articulis Fidei ~ Howard Galloway and Joseph B. Collins
Contra Errores Graecorum ~ Copyright Research
De Forma Absolutionis ~ Looking for Translator
Responsio ad Magistrum Ioannem de Vercellis de 108 Articulis ~ Ryan Brady
Responsio ad Lectorem Venetum de 30 Articulis ~ Ryan Brady
Responsio ad Magistrum Ioannem de Vercellis de 43 Articulis ~ Ryan Brady
Responsio ad Lectorem Venetum de 36 Articulis ~ Ryan Brady
Responsio ad Lectorem Bisuntium de 6 Articulis ~ Ryan Brady
De Emptione et Venditione ~ Looking for Translator
De Secreto ~ Looking for Translator
De Sortibus ~ Copyright Research
De Iudiciis Astrorum ~ Looking for Translator
Ad Bernardum ~ Rik van Nieuwenhove
Ad Ducissam Brabantiae ~ Looking for Translator
De Mixtione Elementorum ~ Peter Orlowski
De Motu Cordis ~ Looking for Translator
De Operationibus Occultis ~ J.B. McAllister

Interested in translating? Contact us

Vol. 58: Opuscula IV ‚Äď Sermons and Liturgical Works
STATUS: Looking for Translators
TRANSLATOR: Contact us
SOURCE TEXTS: Leonine Edition
Sermo Abjiciamus opera
Sermo Attendite
Sermo Beata gens
Sermo Beati qui habitant
Sermo Beatus vir
Sermo Coelum et terra
Sermo Ecce ego mitto
Sermo Ecce rex tuus
Sermo Emitte Spiritum
Sermo Exiit qui seminat
Sermo Germinet terra
Sermo Homo quidam erat
Sermo Homo quidam fecit
Sermo Lauda et laetare
Sermo Lux orta est
Sermo Osanna filio David
Sermo Puer Iesus
Sermo Seraphim stabant
Sermo Veniet desideratus
Officium de Festo Corporis Christi ~ Vincent Corrigan and Joseph Kenny
Hymnus Adoro Te ~ Gerard Manley Hopkins

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Historical Documents (59-60)

The Commentary on the Sentences dates from St. Thomas’s first teaching years in Paris, where he began teaching around the year 1252. As a new teacher, St. Thomas was expected to prepare lectures based on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, thus demonstrating his knowledge of and insight into both theology and philosophy. In the Sentences, St. Thomas was presented with a general theology text which draws upon the writings of the Church Fathers. This was a significant opportunity for St. Thomas to delve into the beauty of theology.Although this text is a commentary on the Sentences, it also contains much original theological thought of St. Thomas himself as he departs at times from the text that he is commenting on to explore other facets of the teaching set forth by Peter Lombard. As this work comes from the earlier years of St. Thomas’s career, it is evident that it represents St. Thomas’s seminal theological thought that is later developed and sharpened in the Summa Theologiae and the Summa Contra Gentiles.

Vol. 1: Commentary on the Sentences Book I, Distinctions 1-21
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATOR:    Fr. Jason Mitchell
SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
In this volume, St. Thomas begins to explore the Trinity, following the order in the Sentences. He treats of the unity of God, the generation of the Son, the proceeding of the Holy Spirit, as well as considering the equality of the persons in the Trinity.
Vol. 2: Commentary on the Sentences Book I, Distinctions 22-48
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATOR:    Fr. Jason Mitchell
SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
Continuing in the same manner as the first volume, St. Thomas continues his examination of the Trinity, and then moves on to discuss the ways that God can be known. He also unfolds an understanding of predestination and the Divine Will.
Vol. 3: Commentary on the Sentences Book II, Distinctions 1-20
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Beth Mortensen, Fr. Dylan Schrader
SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
Moving from exploring the Trinity, St. Thomas now begins to examine creation and God as creator. In this volume, St. Thomas discusses the creation of the angels and the creation of the world. He also begins his treatment of the creation of man.
Vol. 4: Commentary on the Sentences Book II Distinctions 21-44
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Beth Mortensen, Fr. Dylan Schrader
SOURCE TEXTS:    Mandonnet 1929 edition
Continuing his discussion of the creation of man, St. Thomas explores the fall of man. He then examines grace and original sin. From this he moves to a consideration of evil, sin and its consequences.
Vol. 5: Commentary on the Sentences Book III, Distinctions 1-22
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Beth Mortensen, Fr. Dylan Schrader
SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition
This volume begins the consideration of the Incarnation. He treats of how it is possible for the Son to assume human nature and why the Incarnation is necessary for the redemption of man.
Vol. 6: Commentary on the Sentences Book III, Distinctions 23-40
STATUS:    Translating
TRANSLATORS:    Dr. Beth Mortensen, Fr. Dylan Schrader
SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition
Considering the redemption of man, directed St. Thomas’s attention toward a study of the theological virtues that make it possible for man to live a good life. This leads to a discussion of virtues in general along with a consideration of the active and contemplative life.
Vol. 7: Commentary on the Sentences Book IV, Distinctions 1-13
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
EDITORS:    Dr. Peter Kwasniewksi, Dr. Jeremy Holmes
SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition

This volume begins St. Thomas’s most thorough examination of the sacraments. He begins by defining what a sacrament is, then he moves to a study of each individual sacrament. In this volume, he considers the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation and the Holy Eucharist.The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Vol. 8: Commentary on the Sentences Book IV, Distinctions 14-25
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
EDITORS:    Dr. Peter Kwasniewksi, Dr. Jeremy Holmes
SOURCE TEXTS:    Moos 1956 edition

St. Thomas continues his treatise on the Holy Eucharist after the conclusion of which he begins the treatise on Penance. This naturally turns his consideration to the sacrament of Holy Orders.The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Vol. 9: Commentary on the Sentences Book IV, Distinctions 26-42
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
EDITORS:    Dr. Peter Kwasniewksi, Dr. Jeremy Holmes
SOURCE TEXTS:    Parma 1858 edition

This volume contains St. Thomas’s treatise of the sacrament of Matrimony, which he explores in great detail. He explains that Matrimony is unique among the sacraments because it builds upon a natural union.The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Vol. 10: Commentary on the Sentences Book IV, Distinctions 43-50
STATUS:    In Print
TRANSLATOR:    Dr. Beth Mortensen
EDITORS:    Dr. Peter Kwasniewksi, Dr. Jeremy Holmes
SOURCE TEXTS:    Parma 1858 edition

The last volume of the Commentary on the Sentences continues the treatise on Marriage. Finally St. Thomas discusses man’s last end, the resurrection of the body, God’s justice, the final judgment and what constitutes blessedness.The translation of the Commentary on the Sentences, Book IV has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

National Endowment for the Humanities

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these volumes do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The five-year timeline for finishing the Latin-English edition follows. This timeline depends on raising the funds to get it done!

2020 - Aristotle Commentaries
Volume Works Month
50 Metaphysics I July
51 Metaphysics II July
52 Nichomachean Ethics December
47 Physics December
46 On Interpretation,
Posterior Analytics
December
2021 - Disputed Questions, OT, Aristotle

Volume

Works

Month

31

Jeremiah
Lamentations
Isaiah
Rigans Montes
Hic est Liber

January

30

Psalms

February

25

De Potentia

March

26

De Anima

May

53

Politics
Tabula Libri Ethicorum

July

49

On the Soul
On Sensing and Sensation

August

48

On Heaven on Earth
On Generation and Corruption
– Meteora

October

54

De Trinitate
– De Ebdomadibus
De Divinis Nominibus
– De Causis

October

2022 - Catena Aurea, Opuscula, Sentences

Volume

Works

Month

42

Matthew

May

43

Mark

June

44

Luke

July

45

John

August

56

Polemical Writings
Contra impugnantes Dei cultum et religionem
De perfectione spiritualis vitae
Contra doctrinam retrahentium a religione
De unitate intellectus contra Averroistas
De aeternitate mundi

August

3

Book 2, Part 1

October

4

Book 2, Part 2

October

5

Book 3, Part 1

October

6

Book 3, Part 2

October

2023 - Disputed Questions, Sentences

Volume

Works

Month

1

Book 1, Part 1

May

2

Book 1, Part 2

May

29

Quodlibetal Questions

June

23

De Veritate I

July

24

De Veritate II

August

27

De Virtutibus, De Spiritualibus Creaturis

October

28

De Unione Verbi, De Malo

October

2024 - Opuscula, Historical Documents

Volume

Works

Month

57

Collations
– Collationes in decem praecepta
– Collationes in orationem dominicam
– Collationes in Symbolum Apostolorum
– Collationes in salutationem angelicam

 

Letters
– De rationibus fidei ad Cantorem Antiochenum
Expositio super primum et secundam Decretalem ad Archdiaconum Tudertinum
– De articulis fidei et Ecclesiae sacramentis ad Archiepiscopum Panormitanum
– Expositio super Libellum de fide Trinitatis / De doctrinam patrum Graecorum (Contra errores Graecorum)
– De forma absolutionis
– Responsio ad magistrum Ioannem de Vercellis de 108 articulis
– Responsio ad lectorem Venetum de 30 articulis
– Responsio ad magistrum Ioannem de Vercellis de 43 articulis
– Responsio ad lectorem Venetum de 36 articulis
– Responsio ad lectorem Bisuntinum de 6 articulis
– De emptione et venditione ad tempus
– De secreto
– Liber de sortibus ad dominum Iacobum de Tonengo
– De iudiciis astrorum
– Epistola ad Bernardum abbatem casinensem
– Epistola ad ducissam Brabantiae
– De mixtione elementorum ad magistrum Philippum de Castro Caeli
– De motu cordis ad magistrum Philippum de Castro Caeli
– De operationibus occultis naturae ad quendam militem ultramontanum

May

58

Sermons
Sermo Abjiciamus opera
– Sermo Attendite
– Sermo Beata gens
– Sermo Beati qui habitant
– Sermo Beatus vir
– Sermo Coelum et terra
– Sermo Ecce ego mitto
– Sermo Ecce rex tuus
– Sermo Emitte Spiritum
– Sermo Exiit qui seminat
– Sermo Germinet terra
– Sermo Homo quidam erat
– Sermo Homo quidam fecit
– Sermo Lauda et laetare
– Sermo Lux orta est
– Sermo Osanna filio David
– Sermo Puer Iesus
– Sermo Seraphim stabant
– Sermo Veniet desideratus

Liturgical Works
Officium de festo Corporis Christi an mandatum Urbani Papae
– Hymnus Adoro Te

June

59

Biographies, Processes

July

60

Papal Documents

August